Welcome to Nordhavn.com - Power Thats Oceans Apart
   
 
side_menu

Forum

Got a question for the crew on board the Nordhavn 120?
Click here and ask away!


August 26, 2013
Name: Paul
City: San Clemente
State: Ca
Zip: 92672
Country: USA
Subject: Happy Bday DH

Question: Ahoy Mate- Wishing you a Happy Birthday on the high seas. We are looking forward to catching up when your back in SC.

Best

Paul

Doug Harlow On Board Aurora Responds:
Hey Paul...thanks for the Happy Birthday. It was a great day. Sun came out, the ocean was nice and calm. Definitely won't forget that one anytime soon.

Talk to you soon.

Doug


August 26, 2013
Name: Shawn Brechbill
City: San Clemente
State: CA
Zip: 92672
Country: USA
Subject: Happy Birthday Doug

Question: Happy Birthday DH!
Following your daily adventures, what an incredible trip. Not real sure I could handle those 15ft seas, the chunks would be flowing. Looking forward to hearing the stories when you get back
Shawn

Doug Harlow on board Aurora Responds:

Hey Shawn...Good to hear from you. Thanks for the birthday wish.
That was a wild day (15ft seas). Everyone was prettty used to being onboard by then, so there weren't any chunks flowing (not that I know of anyway). The only time I really felt seasick was the first two days out of Hong Kong.

Look froward to seeing you when we get back.

Doug


August 25, 2013
Name: Jim Taylor
City: San Tan Valley
State: Arizona
Zip: 85143
Country: USA
Subject: Chef redundancy

Question: Hi guys,
I've been watching your delivery of Aurora N120 with great excitement. God willing, I hope to start shopping for my first Nordhavn in 1-2 years. A 40 to 56 footer.

My question is about food. It seams you haven't missed a beat calorie wise since chef Derek left. Was this redundancy planned into your voyage just as all the boat systems have redundancy?

I'm praying all is calm and peaceful for you the rest of the way to Vancouver.

Ron Porter on board Aurora responds:

Hi Jim,

There was no planned replacement for the very talented Derek. It was evident that Joe, a Taiwanese engineer is a very good cook, so I offered to alternate with him for the preparation of the evening meals. My culinary skills are limited but I am happy to undertake the task knowing that the expectations are modest.

We did some provisioning in Dutch Harbor so we have an ample supply of fresh fruit, vegetables, fish, chicken and meat. So far the crew appears satisfied with the arrangement. Thanks for enquiring.

Ron


August 25, 2013
Name: Doug Hermann
City: Big Canoe
State: Georgia
Country: USA
Subject: Owners Perspective

Question: We really appreciate being able to follow the progress throughout the build and now the delivery.

Would Mr and/or Mrs Conconi be willing to post to the forum their impressions and feelings of the yacht, the build process and now the experience of crossing the Pacific to Vancouver?

Bob Conconi in Vancouver, BC, responds:

Doug,

You have to experience the majesty of Aurora, her stature and magnitude to get a starting point as to your feelings. She is impressive beyond my or Diane's expectations. She exceeds every dream we have had over the last 4 years in the build process. It is often difficult to imagine the finished product as the construction progresses. We have followed Aurora since she was in a mould through to her launching into the water in Xiamen. Often there were over 100 workers on her in every room doing every imaginable finishing touch. Not a single part of the build has to be refined after delivery, the finish is superb in every way. I hope that answers your question sufficiently. A better reply would require a dialogue.

The experience of crossing the Pacific was both the logistics of clearing and exiting countries and customs and provisioning and then the planning of the actual route and cruise, the estimations of weather and current that will impact our decisions and then the final execution that is a consequence of the planning and the actual circumstances that we encountered.

We went from almost 90 degree water to 48 degree water, the air temperature went from almost 90 degrees to a low 45 degrees, We used air-conditioning and heating during the trip, The water conditions ranged from flat to extreme and Aurora took every situation perfectly, our seas were from the stern and aft quarter and then the bow and the starboard quarter, we surfed up and down waves and kept our course almost perfectly. I can't say too much as to the quality of the ride or the comfort of the ride. We did sleep in the living room one evening as the motion of the bow was extreme during one occasion. The pilot house is extremely central in the movement of the vessel and gave the bridge crew a very comfortable ride. Between Hong Kong and Adak, Aurora ran 24/7 without any stopping at all, we made water and tested every mechanical operation of the vessel.

The only negative is neither Diane and I want to go around the world at 7 knots without more stops for enjoyment and experiencing the locals we visit. The transit of a yacht on a delivery cruise is not a good comparison to the experience a new owner can anticipate.

We are happy with all the electronic and navigation decisions we made in advance and almost all systems performed perfectly as promised. Our list of deficiencies to be completed on arrival is extremely short, I understand that the fixes and the individuals to perform the fixes are all prepared to complete the deficiencies in the first 2 weeks of September.

I am extremely proud of the accomplishment of PAE and South Coast in the construction of such a grand and perfect vessel.

I hope this answers you question in sufficient detail.

Bob


August 25, 2013
Name: Scott Larson
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Subject: General

Question: Hello Aurora:

I am enjoying your postings and pictures immensely.

Can you describe why Aurora has a two level engine room? Is it merely to make maintenance tasks easier or are there systems on both levels?

I know that Nordhavn has tried diesel-electric drives on a yacht before and it didn't work as expected. Was diesel-electric ever a consideration for Aurora and will they be considered going forward with the 120 model?

Finally, do you know if you will have the opportunity to stop at Attu or Kiska to see some of the World War II artifacts?

Thanks

Jeff Leishman on board Aurora responds:

We designed the 120 with a split level engine room In order to maximize the available space. Maintenance on both levels is made very easy by being able to easily access all of the components at a very convenient level.
We never gave the idea of D.E. any thought and are not likely to entertain this type of system again on any Nordhavn. There is too much efficiency loss and complication to make this a viable option to a conventional drive system. We do not have the type of hotel load swings that you would find on a cruise ship where the actual propulsion power consumption is quite low compared to all the other power required to keep the ship running. I am sure there are those who will disagree with our conclusions but for now we will stick with what we know best.
Unfortunately we did not get a chance to see Attu or Kiska however we did get to see a lot of interesting history on both Adak and in Dutch Harbor.


August 22, 2013
Name: Er. Anil Kumar Mittal
City: New Delhi
State: India
Country: IND
Subject: Navigation

Question: A dumb question. How do you navigate through fog or low to zero visibility? And how do you guard against collisions in such conditions, whether submerged bodies or floating ?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Anil,
This is a question that is often asked, and is likely the most stressful thing that comes to mind for a lot of people. Aurora is equipped with an array of expensive and sophisticated electronics which are very trust worthy in the hands of an experienced crew. We have dual radars which can identify the smallest of objects which may be in front or behind us as well as chart plotters that give an accurate position of the vessel in relation to any land masses. The radar has the ability to identify a moving target’s path and will compute the “closest point of approach” or CPA which tells us if we are on a collision course or we will safely pass each other. Once one becomes familiar with the use of this equipment the stress level falls way down. For underwater objects we rely on our charts which are generally very accurate in most parts of the world. If there is a semi submerged object, say a log or container then we do have forward facing sonar which should identify it. However most yachts do not have the sonar so unfortunately for the majority of cruisers you do rely on a bit of luck to keep you from hitting such and object. It is one of the risks we take.


August 22, 2013
Name: John Thompson
City: Alexandria
State: Louisiana
Country: USA
Subject: Pilothouse window

Question: First, I would like to thank all of you for allowing us to follow your journey. I almost hate for it to end. I have very much enjoyed reading the daily updates.

My question is about the pilothouse window. I noticed the window in the center of the pilothouse is one large pane of glass. It seems that is uncharacteristic of all other Nordhavns. Is the height of the pilothouse so high that there is less of a concern of being broken by a large wave?

Thanks again and safe travels.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi John,
The decision to eliminate the center mullion was made after running calculations to ensure that the structure was sufficient to allow for the larger glass to be used without putting too much stress on it. The calculations showed that this was a nonissue so we went ahead and did it. It is one of many things I really think worked. In fact we have now built 3 86’s and a 63 with similar window arrangements. The view is fantastic and it is a bit less FRP to maintain.


August 22, 2013
Name: Jay
City: San Fran
State: California
Zip: 98420
Country: USA
Subject: Fuel

Question: Have you resolved the fuel consumption from your monitoring of fuel consumption vs the MTU displays?

Have you revised your consumption at various RPMs?

I really enjoy reading your Blog Nd forum updates by crew.

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora resonds:

Hi Jay,

We are presently running at about 9 knots and are showing a consumption on each engine of 12 gph for a total of 24. This is based upon the MTU digital readouts which we understand to have an error tolerance of 10% to 15% according to MTU. We are showing an average consumption of generators of about 2 gallons per hour. Generator demand is less now as the air conditioning consumption is far less. I’m not sure why we were showing more earlier on in the trip. Maybe the engines were just breaking in or we could have been in conservative error. You tend to error on the safe side when so much is at stake.

Our conclusion is that we are consuming about 26 gph based upon hourly recordings of our day tank levels. We have gone back and looked at much longer time periods of consumption based upon fuel remaining and am comfortable with the accuracy.

The boat will run far faster and I suspect that the owners will probably run it upwards of 11 knots but since we are paying for the fuel we feel comfortable with the speed selected verses the time allowed.

I spoke with a friend a few days ago operating a vessel of similar size and displacement on a voyage from Tahiti to California. Their speed was running at 10.2 knots with a total consumption of 57 gph and I think our consumption would probably be similar if we wanted to get that speed. As I’m writing this I just ran our engines from 1,390 rpm up to 1,700 and our speed went from about 9.0 to about 10.4 but our consumption went from 12 per side to 24. That’s almost $100 per hour to get a little more than a knot per hour and about $2,400 at the end of the day to be about 30 miles further along. Not at my pay scale…


August 22, 2013
Name: Richard Mezzanotti
City: Swansea
State: Massachusetts
Country: USA
Subject: Heavy Weather

Question: Hello all,
We have enjoyed following your delivery very much. The yacht is just amazing.
We recently sold our sailboat and are now looking to transition to a trawler for the first time NH47. Having been a sailor all my life I am interested in how heavy weather tactics change with a trawler. I have been caught a couple of times traveling from Bermuda to Antigua in 40kts with 20+ swells. In a sailboat you have a progression of options to deal with the weather, shorten down, drag wraps, sea anchor, run off, etc...
When you can't make it to a safe anchorage, what is your process for dealing with heavy weather.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Richard,

This is a subject that we discuss frequently and there is no absolute correct answer. During the ATW onboard the N40 we carried a parachute anchor and had it rigged and in place ready for deployment should it have been necessary. Most of the folks who intend to do long hauls will likely have such a devise onboard. The only time I could see using this would be in the event that you lose power since the main tactic in a boat such as a Nordhavn would be to jog into the oncoming head seas. This is the safest position for the boat in these conditions and this would be our ultimate strategy should things turn really ugly. The best strategy is always to look for a safe haven which is exactly why we chose to put into Adak last week.


August 22, 2013
Name: Marilyn Mower
City: Fort Lauderdale
State: FL
Country: USA
Subject: Bering Sea storm

Question: Thanks for posting the video of the storm that sent you for cover at Adak Island. Did you stop mostly for reasons of comfort or because slogging along would have created a fuel problem?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Marilyn,
The only reason for putting into Adak was for comfort. We could have continued on to Dutch Harbor but there was no reason to beat ourselves or the boat up. We had plenty of full onboard. It has always been our philosophy to play things safe and if you find yourself in 50+ knots of wind and 12-15 foot seas on your beam with the likelihood of it deteriorating further you should always consider the safest option. In our case we had a beautiful safe anchorage less than 10 miles from us, we had been at sea for 3 weeks. This was a no brainer and to those who would second guess that decision, I suggest you put yourself in that position sometime. The safety of the crew and the vessel are always the number one concern no matter what the conditions.


August 22, 2013
Name: Jerry Mitchell
City: Albany
State: Oregon
Country: USA
Subject: Cavitation

Question: Jim, I see you put saltwater all over your new boat.!! My question did the propellers come out of the water or did you experience any cavitation? Have a Safe rest of your trip. Jerry

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Jerry,

Yes we have taken spray when the sea and wind is up but no real heavy water aboard. We have soft bottom inflatables as temporary tenders on our bow and there is no way to really secure them like a permanent hard tender. They are a bad fit to the deck chocks which will take the permanent tenders and there are only glue on ring pads to tie to. I was worried if heavy water came board over our bow the small inflatables could break loose. So far no problem with just heavy spray.

Our propellers have never cavitated and the weather thus far has only been uncomfortable and never dangerous. Our diversion to Adak was only precautionary and to avoid any unnecessary stress on our new vessel and the 14 crew aboard. To continue on in building seas and fifty knot winds when shelter was so near - would not have been the prudent thing to do however the boat was riding easy and could have easily pressed on.


August 22, 2013
Name: Tom Sullivan
City: Rangeley
State: Maine
Country: USA
Subject: woodwork

Question: What species of wood is in the wheelhouse and how was it finished?

And thanks for the virtual cruise...was quite a journey thanks guys.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Tom,
All of the main wood in the boat is African Cherry. There are inlays of other types of wood in the tables and on drawer fronts, etc. The wood is finished in a two part varnish with typically at least 7 coats. It is a Japanese product that I do not recall the name.


August 21, 2013
Name: Finn
City: Vancouver
State: BC
Country: USA
Subject: Adak
(Note: this was a letter written directly to owner Bob Conconi)

Hello Bob & Diane

I wanted to share with you a bit of history.
As you know Bob, I was part of the team the designed, developed and accepted the CP 140 “Aurora” Maritime Patrol aircraft from 1972 to 1980 and flew her operationally from Comox for four years. Ironically, during that time, I flew many missions from Adak in the early 80s (cold war stuff) and led many detachments from there, typically 2 – 3 weeks at a time. We would fly maximum effort and then to “relax” we would jog. The running trail was about 10 miles around the island. Because the weather could be so ferocious, and so sudden, we all had to have weather and survival briefings the first time there. There were “storm barrels” stationed about every mile along the route so that we could take shelter in the event of sudden weather and winds. I have actually seen an empty 50 gallon oil drum airborne and “float” across the tarmac between our parked airplanes. Ravens and Eagles so big you could ride them! It is an amazing place. Just think of the poor sods that were there in WWII, with minimum support, in tents! There is an excellent book about the WWI history of the Aleutians, fascinating. That stop was worth the journey by itself.

Welcome home

Finn


August 21, 2013
Name: Hank Olden
City: Chagrin Falls
State: Ohio
Country: USA
Subject: traffic

Question: since passing the north island of japan have you encountered much traffic?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Hank,

We are underway again for our final push into Vancouver and are now back in the Pacific. During our transit of the Bering Sea we saw very little traffic. Most of the boats we did see were fishing vessels of about 200-300 feet. Since leaving Dutch Harbor traffic has been very light as well.


August 21, 2013
Name: Mark Vanderbyl
City: North Vancouver
State: B.C.
Country: CAN
Subject: Vessel monitoring

Question: I've been really enjoying the unprecedented coverage of this epic journey and of course, further kudos on an incredible yacht! I'm fascinated by all the systems on board and had a question regarding the vessel monitoring system. I've run yachts with both Intellisea and FT NavVision systems on board so am quite familiar with modern vessel monitoring systems and absolutely LOVE the ability to monitor so many systems from one easy to navigate screen. I was watching Paul Grover's video from 8/08 describing the Böning system and noticed that, when he went to the engine screen, none of the onscreen gauges seemed to be populated with values: RPM, Engine Oil Pressure, etc. Obviously the video is a little grainy but other screens were readable so I was wondering if there was a small glitch in communication with the engine ECM's or the values just hadn't populated yet. Also, I noticed the "Inv" everywhere in the system. What does that mean? Is there some further programming yet to be done in the system during the final commissioning?Thanks to the crew for keeping us informed and continued safe travels.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Mark,
The Boning system we are using is fantastic and gives us good information on everything but the engine status. This is due to a glitch that came up during its final commissioning at by the Boning folks where they discovered they had issues with their ability to communicate with the MTU’s. There was no time to fix it as we had to depart so they will come to the boat in Vancouver to do the final commissioning and fine tuning once we arrive.
Jeff


August 21, 2013
Name: Lars Moe
City: Stokke
State: Vestfold
Zip: 3160
Country: MOR
Subject: Translated with Google translator

Question: Hey! Congratulations on a beautiful yacht. I can see a check box on the chair in the wheelhouse. What can you operates at it?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Lars,
Aurora has four Stidd helm chairs two in the wheel house and two in the enclosed fly bridge.
The main chair in each area is equipped with a remote auto pilot control which is what I think you are seeing.


August 21, 2013
Name: Dave Horan
City: Bettendorf
State: Iowa
Country: USA
Subject: ABS Sea Trials

Question: What a fantastic voyage! My question…During your ABS sea trials Aurora performed her emergency crash stop with flying colors. Can you describe the procedure? How does the running gear withstand that much change in direction that quickly?
Exposing this brand new vessel to the world, in all this detail, under real sea conditions is a testament to the confidence Nordhavn has in their design & craftsmanship! Smooth Sailing!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Dave,
The procedure for the crash stop is simple enough; you must go from full forward to full reverse with no lag time. However the engine controls themselves will spool down with some lag built in so it is not as violent as it might seem. As I stated in an earlier response, the WOT in reverse is a much more nerve wracking test.


August 21, 2013
Name: Gordon Craig
City: Kirkliston
State: Lothian
Country: GBR
Subject: Exhaust

Question: She certainally is a beautiful boat and now you appear to have entered the Bering Sea the voyage is getting more gripping to follow.

I was wondering if you have stayed with the exhaust system as on the smaller Nordhavns - ie: dry exhaust up the mast so to speak?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Gordon,

The exhaust system on the 120 is quite elaborate. It is like nothing we have ever done. Our original intent was to have a more conventional wet exhaust system similar to what we do on our 86. However during discussions with MTU and with Sound Down it was decided that the type of system we proposed may have a risk of creating too much back pressure due to the length of the run aft. We then asked the engineers at Sound Down to design and build us a system which would ensure we do not exceed the maximum allowable back pressure.
This resulted in the team designing an underwater exhaust which eliminated the need to run it all the way aft. The system is quite elaborate with a large by-bass for dockside and low speed maneuvering which eliminated the possibility of it bubbling and also eliminates any back pressure as there is no vacuum to take the exhaust away. We never considered a dry system for the 120 due to the heavy impact it would have on the interior spaces and also the required amount of keel cooling for these two big engines was far more than we were comfortable with.


August 21, 2013
Name: Mike Riddles
City: Brighton
State: Sussex
Country: GBR
Subject: Windows

Question: I notice that on several Nordhavns, including the 120, that you have quite large windows in the forward part of the hull. Does this affect the sea states that the vessels can deal with in comparison to those that don't have the large windows?
Safe seas for the rest of your fantastic voyage :-)
PS: Is hull #2 under construction yet???

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Mike,
In the initial design phase we have to consider the location of all the windows and port holes to determine which area they fall in under the ABS guides for classing yachts. The guide clarifies this so we can easily identify the area to be concerned with. Although the forward windows are pretty large and far forward they are in a location, height wise, which puts them above the weather deck level. There are no sea state restrictions of any kind in association with any of the windows or port holes on the vessel. However to pass ABS we obviously have to comply with all of their requirements for thickness and glass type to be used. The lower level port holes all have to have steel storm plates provided which are stored in each cabin. The windows however are not required to have storm plates.


August 21, 2013
Name: Ed Duke
City: Olympia
State: Washington
Country: USA
Subject: Oil Change System

Question: The other day the engineer posted info on tank capacity of both new and used engine oil.
Is it possible to burn off any of the used oil thru the fuel system?

Thanks for all the info you folks are sending. Thank you so much.

Ed

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Ed,
I know some people routinely dump their used oil into the fuel and swear that it has no ill effects. However every time we have asked our engine suppliers if this is advisable, or even allowed, they tell us no it is not. For us that is enough to squelch any thought of doing such a thing.


August 21, 2013
Name: Dale
City: Washington
State: DC
Country: USA
Subject: watch rotation

Question: Impressive Boat. Have sailed that water in ships many times, but all bigger and gray, and not near as nice.
Question: How many people do you have on watch at a time, and what is the watch rotation?

Enjoy the journey!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Dale,
We always have two of us on watch at all times. We have three watch teams and our rotation is such that our evening watches from 1800hrs until 0600hrs are limited to two hours each, while the 0600hrs to 1800hrs are four hours each. This schedule has worked well for Jim and me in the past as it limits those longer late night watches and gives everyone plenty of rest in between. Thanks for following us.


August 18, 2013
Name: Michael Boney
City: Long Beach
State: CA
Country: USA
Subject: Owners aboard

Question: Congratulations! A huge sense of accomplishment must be felt by all! For the PAE crew who could not be on board, I am with you…jealous!!

More of a comment than a question. Having done some delivery myself, what a learning experience for the owners to be on board and aware of every situation as it occurs during a delivery. Once they arrive in B.C., they will truly have a working understanding of all systems and performance of this wonderful investment.

Often times once we have handed the boat over to the new owners, the crew always says, “with they’d have been with us – they would understand their boat.”

Regardless of who actually does the maintenance, repair, and upkeep, the new owners are informed and knowledgeable.

Dutch Harbor for fuel? Or an excuse for some King Crab?!

Bob Conconi on board N120 Aurora responds:

Good question Michael,

Diane and I are learning by the day, we spend 8 hours a day 50% in the dark and 50% during the day standing watch. Most of that time is spent observing operation, traffic and weather and then reading and investigating every operational issue. An alarm deserves investigation, most of the time it is a door left open, low fuel tank indication, or something of a similar nature. Many different electronics on the bridge provide separate and distinct alarms. We are learning what piece of equipment gives what alarms.

One of our best purchase decisions is having a complete vessel monitoring systems by Boening. This system has two monitors in our flybridge, two monitors in our pilot house, one monitor in the captains quarters and one in the engine room. With these monitors we can visualize our fuel consumption, electrical loads, temperatures etc. If any reading is outside of a tolerance we have again another alarm.

I believe that by the time we dock Aurora in Vancouver we will understand all the technical/operational functions of the vessel.

From there, we will develop a comprehensive maintenance program. It is a labor of true pleasure for us. We are fortunate to have the technical writer of the manual onboard composing each chapter with us and we have direct input into the final product.

To answer your question a slightly different way, I don't know if we could have done this better.

To answer your last question: "both fuel and crab"!


August 18, 2013
Name: David Ferebee
City: Wilton Manors
State: FL
Country: USA
Subject: Server

Question: I have been following your progress each day and can hardly wait to read and see the pics/videos of the goings on of Aurora and the gang! Thanks for letting us enjoy your adventures from our arm chairs and computer screens!!

I really enjoyed seeing the picture of your server setup and am curious how you access the rear of the rack? Can you give us a detailed description of each piece in the rack top to bottom and give us some more details about your internet service and TV service such as the speed, package you are using, cost, capacity, coverage, etc?

Can you tell I am a techie?

Bob Conconi on board N120 Aurora responds:

David, we have received several questions our entertainment systems.

We have 3 networks on Aurora, "Navigation", "Audio/Video" & "Communications'. Each of these systems are "separate" and "standalone" and can be connected should the requirement arise.

With the exception of Navigation, the Audio/Video & Communications systems are distributed both by WiFi (in a bridge configuration providing continuous single login) and hardwire to each accommodation area and social area on Aurora,

Each stateroom has access to Bell ExpressVu, Kaledescape, IPad, CCTV, Navigation maps, Sirius/XM audio, DVD, AM/FM. Our amplification by stateroom is by Bose and we have both V25 and V35 systems depending on the location.

We have 12 Samsung monitor/televisions of various sizes.

Our internet is from 48" Seatel Sat, WIFI from shore and cable/telephone/cell connections to shore sources. On this cruise we have 1024 kbs down and 256 kbs up speeds with 36 CIR guaranteed for our telephone system connection. We are being transferred from sat provider to sat provider during our crossing of the ocean , no one provider has a single beam that will provide continuous service to us.

Our telephone system is a Panasonic IP phone system with 15 stations.

Our telephone service comes from Seatel Sat, Tellular cell and corded shore sources.

The rack is on a rail system and extends 36 inches out of the wall cabinet.

The area is specifically air conditioned for the cooling of the computer equipment.

We have separate racks for our navigation computers and Communications servers with redundancy on the pilothouse and fly bridge levels.


August 9, 2013
Name: Terry Callaghan
City: Brisbane
State: Queensland
Country: AUS
Subject: retirement

Question: G’day all, I hope all of you are safe & well. Exciting times - you must be extremely proud of the mightiest Nordhavn built so far. Will we see a 150? It seems a logical progression . I read about you thinking of hanging up the old pen, you could not get a higher point in your career than now but who would replace you? Will you have a hand over ceremony in Canada?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Terry,
Yes the 120 is a very satisfying achievement. As I stated in an earlier post this project is a result of a whole bunch of talent contributing to the final outcome of what is truly an incredibly nice boat in all respects. You never know what the future has in store but assuming we have a rising tide and continued success with all of our existing models a 150 would certainly not be a huge challenge. As for hanging up my pen, I have no intention of doing that anytime soon. I still have a lot of ideas and designs in my head that I hope to see come to fruition some day. Stay tuned.
I am sure the Bob and Diane will have a very nice christening ceremony with family and friends as soon as they have had a chance to decompress from this long voyage.


August 9, 2013
Name: Donald Marquart
City: Scottsdale
State: AZ
Country: USA
Subject: Full Power Trial

Question: Enjoyed the full power video. How long does it take to get to full power? What speed did you achieve. Fuel consumption?

Curious as well if acceptance trial includes the exercise of full power ahead to emergency back? Always an interesting event on Naval ships.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Donald

During our WOT runs we usually get right up to speed within less than a minute. We run for about 5-10 minutes and we are seeing about 13-14 knots thru the water.

As part of the ABS sea trials they do require us to do a “crash stop” maneuver. However the most stressful test is the full astern which is always a lot of fun with waves crashing into the transom.


August 9, 2013
Name: Soren Petersson
City: Snohomish
State: WA
Country: USA
Subject: Video 7/29

Question: I can tell you that I have been following the progress of the delivery of the 120.What a beautiful ship. On your vedeo of 7/29 it shows that you are traling two ropes off the aft end can you tell me what you are doing with them.

Thanks for all the nice videos
Soren

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Soren,
The two lines you see are our attempt to catch some fresh fish. So far we have caught two nice Mahi Mahi. Since the water has cooled off to the low 50s we have had no more luck. We may try again later but now our lines are in and we have to settle for what we have on board.


August 9, 2013
Name: Mark Bonds
City: Gilbert
State: AZ
Country: USA
Subject: Picture of mast just posted

Question: Thank you so much for giving us all the opportunity to share in this adventure!

One of the pictures posted today is taken from the upper rear deck facing forward looking at the rear of the mast. It looks like the mast has a pivot point at its base which might allow it to swing back and down. Is that the case? For bridge clearance, maintenance, both?

Thanks!

Mark Bonds

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Mark,

Yes, the mast is folding so that the owner can get the boat into his boat house. Having the ability to lower the mast does make cleaning and service very convenient.


August 9, 2013
Name: Angus Matthews
City: Pender Island
State: British Columbia
Country: CAN
Subject: Sea temperature

Question: I am curious about sea temperature. Do you monitor it and if so what are you finding? What range of sea temps can the engine cooling system tolerate?
This is a fantastic adventure to follow and your commentary, blog, video and photography are first class! Keep up the amazing work, we all appreciate it.
Tell Bob and Diane... endless summer on Pender. Current weather Bedwell Harbour winds calm, seas flat, sky clear, 23 degrees C, vis unlimited. Looking forward to arrival.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Angus,
We have gone from 87 degree water in Xiamen to 52 degree water now. The engine cooling system can handle the higher temps with no problem. Now that we are in cooler water and air temps the engine room is running quite a bit cooler but the engines themselves are stable at about 163 degrees regardless of the sea water temp. We run the engines up to WOT once a day and we are seeing the temps go up to about 183 degrees.


August 9, 2013
Name: Todd
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Subject: Server

Question: Nordhavn Team, what a great adventure and great photos. Thanks for sharing with all of us. Question is other than keeping it open have you had to do anything else to keep the server rack cool?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Todd,
The server room has its own A/C air handler which keeps things nice and cool. The only reason the door is off of the locker is because the server rack is not pushed back all the way into the locker. Once the electronics tech has had a chance to finish all of the various outstanding installations for the A/V system we will clean up the wiring in the A/V locker and re-install to door.


August 6, 2013
Name: Scott Urban
City: Sandy
State: Utah
Country: USA
Subject: complexity

Question: Hi Nordhavn Team.  Congratulations on the construction of such a wonderful vessel!  My question deals with the issue of complexity. Obviously the larger the build there is increase in the complexity. So, does this vessel require a full time mechanic? 

Jim Leishman on board N120 responds:

There is no question that this is a large and complex vessel and requires a thorough understanding of the systems to safely operate it. The actual handling in terms of maneuvering and docking really presents no greater challenges that what you would find in a 60 foot vessel so the added expertise required centers around the many complex systems. A savvy owner can handle the engineering aboard but most will rely upon an engineer.


August 6, 2013
Name: Dan
City: Fremont
State: CA
Country: USA
Subject: engine

Question: What are the various sound levels (decibels) like?  Engine room, salon, on deck?
I look forward to learning about the ‘day to day’ comments / concerns that need to be dealt with.  Safe travels to all.
D

Jim Leishman on board N120 responds:

The noise levels throughout the boat are very low with the most prominent sounds being the HVAC fans and then the outside sounds of water against the hull and wind against the superstructure. Actual DB readings will range from the mid 50s to high 60s depending upon the location tested. The noisiest cabins are low and aft and subject to shaft and propeller noise. The quietest cabins are forward and above the saloon deck.

We would expect more problems on a brand new boat but surprisingly we have very few aboard. Mostly little calibration issues with electronics that don’t adversely affect our delivery passage and will be dealt with by their suppliers once we arrive in Canada.


August 6, 2013
Name: Mike Benson
City: Calgary
State: Alberta
Country: CAN
Subject: Permanent crew

Question: First of all thank you for sharing this journey! I know the Conconis have had several Nordhavns and tend to go it on their own but after seeing the engine room on the 120, which is both amazing and somewhat intimidating, will they be hiring a permanent crew? Have a great trip!

Mike

Jim Leishman on board N120 responds:

My understanding is that a crew will be hired by the Conconis. They have been reviewing resumes on this trip. I’m sure Bob is qualified to run this vessel but I think he’s looking at a more relaxed type of cruising with some professional help.


August 6, 2013
Name: Lawrence Tull
City: Fruitvale
State: TX
Country: USA
Subject: Engine Room

Question: Quite an engine room, you can understand why an engineer is required on board. Is it air conditioned?  I didn’t notice any batteries; are they located in another room or is a generator run all the time?

Jim Leishman on board N120 responds:

Yes, the engine is air-conditioned and very well ventilated. The AC would generally only be used during maintenance when propulsion engines are not running.

All batteries are located within the engine room except for the emergency electronics batteries which are located on the wheelhouse deck. This is a vessel that is dependent upon AC generators anytime it is away from the dock. Batteries are used for engine and generator starting, emergency lighting and navigation electronics.


August 6, 2013
Name: Chris Moss
City: Liverpool
State: Merseyside
Country: GBR
Subject: Engine room

Question: Hi, been a watcher of this journey from the start, fantastic.
On the photos realeased 04-08 number 9/75. Could you please tell me what is the red door with the 2 pull handles on. Is it an escape route?
Hope weather keeps being kind to you, safe passage.
Regards, Chris  

Jim Leishman on board N120 responds:

What you are describing is the inspection plate on the engine room “day tank”. This would only be removed for tank cleaning or inspection. The handles are there for handling of the heavy plate once it is unbolted from the actual tank.


August 2, 2013
Name: Andrés
City: Vigo
State: Galicía
Country: ESP
Subject: Boat desing

Question: Translation by Google Traslate.

Greetings to all members of the crew of the Nordhavn 120.
I have followed the steps in this spectacular ship virtually from the beginning.
It is a beautiful boat.My note for the ship on 10/10. In aluminío 11.
But since I saw the planes for the first time, I've always wondered why they separated from the cabins of the guests at both sides of the engine room is something I never understood.
It is a solution that I don't like it, I think that the timing would have been much more harmonious with all cabins in the same area of the boat.

Good crossing and good sea.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Andres’,
We considered having all the cabins forward of the engine room in early phases of the design. We could do that on future hulls if the buyer preferred. However, separating the guest cabin as we have done has several benefits which the owners found more attractive than having all the cabins forward. Having one stairwell serve all four guest cabins was a concern in that with the potential of 8 people being in this area there would inevitably be traffic flow problems. Having one foyer serve all 4 guest cabins also had limitations. By putting the two cabins aft it made it possible for the crew to utilize the forward area which also gave them easier access to the galley and wheel house via their own separate stairwells.
You can have it any way you like, as they say “there are two ways to skin a cat”.


August 2, 2013
Name: Jim Eckford
City: Arroyo Grande
State: Ca
Country: USA
Subject: Several things

Question: With the owners aboard I would have expected those covers on the tables and chairs would be off.

That is a fabulous vessel!
Congratulations to everyone involved.
We hope to see it sometime.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Jim,

We decided to keep the boat in cruising mode for the crossing. After all this is essentially a delivery trip. Bob and Diane are good with keeping the covers on and as we approach Vancouver we will unveil the boat so it shows well when we get there.


August 2, 2013
Name: Nahum Menkes
City: Petach Tikva
State: Israel
Country: ISR
Subject: Throttles position

Question: Being a seaman for more than 40 years, I find your trip amazing and highly interesting, i enjoy very much tracking your daily events through your site.

I noticed in two photos (1,13) that the throttles are not in the same position,can you comment on that?
Thanks,
Nahum

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Nahum,
You are very observant! The throttles are set in a synchronize mode so you only have to adjust the starboard one for both engines.


August 2, 2013
Name: Karla
City: kamloops
State: B.C.
Country: CAN
Subject: scared to death

Question: This is not good weather so why not pull into a little cove thingy and be safe for a while? Like this is not good, and if you guys make it home safe it will be because the good lord is watching out for you all. And I don't like this at all. BAD VERY BAD


Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Karla,
Thanks for your concern. The weather is really not that bad in fact it is very nice out today. Anyway the little cove thingies are kind of hard to find out here.


August 2, 2013
Name: Sam L
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Subject: Dinghy

Question: It looks like Aurora is outfitted with two small inflatables on the foredeck. Does she carry a larger dinghy elsewhere? Or maybe the the size of the dinghies isn't obvious because of the huge scale of the mothership?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
Hi Sam,

The two dinghies you see on the foredeck are just for this delivery. We didn’t ship the owner’s dinghies to the yard but we wanted a couple of inflatable’s in case we needed to get to shore somewhere and also for safety should an abandon ship situation arise. These will come off the boat and be shipped back to PAE


July 31, 2013
Name: David
City: Vancouver
State: BC
Country: CAN
Subject: the motion of the ocean

Question: Hi guys,

It really is fascinating following your travels.

I have a couple of questions.

1) You mention the seas are building to 10 ft, perhaps it will be more by the time you respond to this. I would be interested to hear about the perceived comfort level on the 120 as compared say to the 86, 76, and N60's. Are 10 ft seas even noticeable on the N120? Is sleeping an issue while at sea?

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds to this and the following questions:

Jim- So far we have been very comfortable. There is no substitute for tonnage and the 120 is more than double the weight of the 86. It makes a difference in the motion.

2) Based on your route planning you estimated >9000 nm range at less than 10 kn. You have been running at 8 kn but the overall range now being contemplated is closer to 6500-7500 nm. Are these numbers correct with your current readings (now 1 week in?) What explains the discrepancy in range initially proposed? Do you think you will stop in Dutch Harbor for fuel? Why not fuel up in Tokyo? Is customs clearance a hassle?

Jim- We have a discrepancy between the engine control fuel consumption and the readings of the Boening electronic quantity sensors. Our consumption according to MTU and Onan is about 18 gallons per hour at a little over 8 knots through the water. The Boening readouts indicate a consumption that may be as high as 23 gallons per hour. We have to use the most pessimistic indication we have for planning. At this stage using our average speed and the higher consumption I calculate we have over 4,000 gallons aboard as we pass Dutch Harbor. I hope to see improvements in speed and reduced consumptions. We’ll make a decision about a stop in Dutch later in the trip.

3) Why are Nordhavns sold with 400' of anchor chain? Why not 500, or 550, or 650 feet? How much chain does Aurora have?

Jim- We have 400 feet on each anchor. More is always better but the weight becomes an issue.

4) Can you describe Aurora's safety features for crossing the pacific including lift rafts, epirbs, back up communications, survival suits, safety drills, etc?

Jim-
We have two 12-man life rafts, two 12-foot sport boats, 2 Epirbs, two locater beacons, survival suits, life jackets, flares, water proof VHF radios and a portable Iridium satellite phone.

5) Why are hydraulics used extensively. I understand they are required for steering and stabilizers but why are windlasses and thrusters typically not specified as electric DC or AC?

Jim- A central hydraulic system in included within the vessel so taking advantage of the system allows for the economical addition of these appliances.

6) What is the large white fiberglass tray around Aurora's hot tub for? Is it a big drip tray so the HT can be used at sea? Seems almost like a waste of space but I suppose there is an important function for it.

Jim- This is to catch the sloshing water and drain it back into tub.

7) Granted that Aurora is an amazing ship and the outcome of hard years of work it is spectacular. You have stated though, an important aspect to your "own bottom delivery" is to experience the boat for the purpose of future improvements. Have you yet found any optimizations large or small that you might plan to change on Aurora, future N120's or other Nordhavn's?

Jim- Yes of course – nothing of significance yet though. One of the benefits of having Jeff and I along with our engineers – Mike, Johnny, David and Joe onboard for this trip is that we will all learn more about the boats we build which goes towards constant improvement.

8) Would it be possible to begin to share interior photos, including the incredible huge windows? Is Aurora's layout similar to the general arrangements on your website?

Jim- All the photos available are on our website.

10) Is Aurora equipped with forward looking sonar? Is this technology really that useful for identifying safe anchorages (which I would imagine would be all the more important with Aurora's draft)

Jim- Yes, Aurora has a forward looking sonar. It does not appear to be of use in open water but could be very helpful in getting in and out of a tight anchorage.

 

July 30, 2013
Name: Conny Nordin
City: Galiano Island
State: British Columbia
Country: CAN
Subject: Blog posts

Question: Very much enjoying the progress of this beautiful boat, and looking forward to welcoming Bob and Diane and the Aurora home, into Canada's Gulf Islands.

The photographs are stunning: who is the 'staff photographer' aboard and what camera?
Submit: Submit

Doug Harlow on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Conny,

Thank you for your comments. I have been taking the photos as well as shooting video and updating the website.

The camera equipment I have been using is as follows:

Cameras:
Canon 5D Mark III
GoPro Hero 2

Lenses:
Tokina 16-28mm F 2.8
Canon 50mm F 1.4
Canon 75-300mm F 4.5

The lens I use for 90% of the shots is the Tokina 16-28mm wide-angle. I absolutely love that lens.

I also have a Canon T3i as a back-up camera along with various other lenses.

Humidity has been a bit of a factor with lens fog. Also, the salt air tends to build on the camera and lens, so they have to be constantly cleaned. Other than that, its been a lot of fun shooting this boat. It's always nice to have such great subject matter!

Thanks again Conny,
Doug


July 30, 2013
Name: Ken Williams
City: Seattle
State: WA
Country: USA
Subject: Crew

Question: Has Bob indicated what size crew (and, what type crew) he'll have after he takes possession of the boat? I'm curious how large a crew the boat will need.

Does the sea chest on the N120 indicate a change of thinking for Nordhavn? Will other models start appearing with a "through to the bottom" sea chest”

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Ken,

I’ll let Bob and Diane discuss their crew plans but will attempt to answer the second question.

The sea chest on the 120 is an incredible piece of work. All of the sea water plumbing on the boat is copper nickel as well as both of the sea chest tubes.
On this boat we have the room and the budget for such an elaborate system. On our smaller models it is difficult to find the room. One of the problems we have seen on the smaller models with sea chest is that the number and length of the hose runs can be an issue. The hoses eventually need to be replaced and this can be a difficult and costly process. With copper nickel piping it is there for the life of the boat. We also have the Cathelco system which eliminates much of the troublesome growth you can get in the piping. Mike described this in his blog yesterday. To do all copper nickel piping on a smaller model would be a huge expense and also slow our production line down. We do not have plans to incorporate such a system in anything but 120.

Jeff


July 30, 2013
Name: Michael Wilson
City: Cheshire
State: Connecticut
Country: USA
Subject: 120 Heavy Weather

Question: Like others, I am enjoying the Blog and updates;
My question deals with the rating and certifications that the 120 is built to. Clearly, no one wishes to intentionally experience severe conditions. However, if the ship had to endure them, what is the most extreme weather she could safely be subjected to?

I look forward to following the rest of the journey and sampling a Nordhavn.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 responds:

Hi Michael,
The biggest thing you have to worry about in heavy weather is something breaking down which could make an already bad situation into a very dangerous one. For example if a hull window were to get broken by a big wave or the rudders/steering system failed you would be in a precarious spot. Building the vessel with ABS class ensures that the design and the construction are all carried out in accordance with their rules which are very conservative when it comes to systems and structures. We have to do a WOT (wide open throttle) in reverse maneuver during the ABS sea trials for 5 minutes. It was like a scene out of Jaws where the waves were crashing over the swim step. They make us do that to put the absolute maximum amount of stress on the rudders and the system to see if it breaks. Hull windows are heavily scrutinized as well as the general machinery arrangements. We are very satisfied with the construction and systems operation of the 120 and we also conducted an incline test to ensure that our stability numbers were on target. So unless something goes terribly wrong I feel that the boat can take more than the crew.
Let’s hope we don’t have to test that theory and that (weather router) Omni Bob keeps us out of trouble!


July 30, 2013
Name: Kyle Pedlar
City: Denver
State: CO
Country: USA
Subject: Privacy

Question: With 14 people aboard the vessel right now does it feel like it could comfortably hold even more folks or you think 14 is just enough/too much? Are you able to find quiet spaces occasionally for some privacy?

I've been following the build of this boat since its inception and want to thank you so much for this blog! Helps with daydreaming! Safe travels!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Kyle,
We were just discussing this last night and commenting on how easy it is to find a spot all to yourself if you so desire . For example I am sitting typing this in the sky lounge and have it all to myself. We technically have bunks for two more until the boat is full to capacity and I still feel that it can handle that many people without feeling crowded. However in normal situations 6 of those aboard would be crew and they have their own lounge area which is very comfortable with a 65 inch tv and Bose system so they would tend to keep to themselves if that’s what the owner wanted.

Jeff


July 30, 2013
Name: Rich H
City: West Palm Beach
State: Fl
Country: USA
Subject: N120 performance

Question: Can you give us some seat of the pants stats on roll rate, how she handles big seas etc..?. She definitely is the queen of the fleet!

Thanks for sharing your journey and congrats to the new owners!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Rich,
We have a neat device which is part of the boning vessel monitoring system which gives us a graphic display of the boat’s roll and pitch motions. We are currently running down swell (slightly quartering) in about 25-30 knots. The seas are between 6-8 feet with the occasional 10 footer. The roll indicator shows us generally keeping upright within about 1-3 degrees however when those occasion larger swell roll under we can see sometimes up to a 14-15 degree roll. The stabilizers are doing a great job but they just can’t anticipate when the boat will be upset so quickly by an odd wave. Even at 120 feet these kinds of seas will upset you every once in a while so things have to be stowed properly just as you would any other smaller vessel.


July 29, 2013
Name: Chloe
City: Perth
State: Western Australia
Country: AUS
Subject: What's on the menu

Question: Hi my name is Chloe. I'm 12 years of age. My dad has been a fan of Nordhavn's for lots of years and has been showing us your wonderful trip on Aurora. I love cooking and wonder what the chef Derek thinks about cooking at sea on Aurora and what he is planning to feed the crew on such a long journey?

Chef Derek Christensen on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hello Chloe,

Thank you for the excellent and intriguing question. To be honest, we are eating rather normal food, similar to that which I frequently prepare at home or the restaurant I work at.

Breakfast includes a variety of daily made pastries, eggs, oatmeal, cereal, etc. Lunch generally consists of soup and salad, and dinner leftovers. A rotation of proteins including pork, beef, duck, shrimp, scallops, and fish. And recently, fresh fish caught while underway. It can be tricky at times cooking for thirteen, three times a day, but fortunately they all have big appetites and have fairly easy-to-please taste buds.

Thanks again for the question and following our travels.


July 28, 2013
Name: Sam Funk
City: San Clemente
State: CA
Country: USA
Subject: Contingencies

Question: As friends with Doug, we are watching your trip with excitement and look forward to hearing first hand accounts of the adventure. My question: What contingency do you have should the prop get entangled or fouled with with debris? Do you have a qualified diver on board? Praying for a safe and enjoyable voyage for all.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Sam,

In the unfortunate event that we do foul a prop we have a simple hooka system on board along with wet suits ,masks and pull saws to try to cut what ever may be around the prop. We have no real dive gear on board. Let's hope we don't need any of it

Jeff


July 28, 2013
Name: Buddy Bethea
City: Stuart
State: FL
Country: USA
Subject: Several questions

Question: Jim
When a navigating through the squid fleet, or avoiding small boats or flotsam, do you hand steer the ship, or dodge with the AP jog lever?
Is AUROA reasonably responsive to hand steering (assuming that that that is a wheel at the helm!)?
Are you using FLIR at night?
Your blog brings back so many great memories of our 15,000 NM journey on our NH!
Wish we too were back out there on the seas !!


Thanks,
Buddy (& Kathy)

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Buddy,

Good to hear from you. Generally we just use the knob on the A/P to maneuver around any boats or flotsam. The shipping traffic is easy to negotiate since with the AIS system and ARPA we know well in advance if we should make a course adjustment. Aurora is very easy to hand steer although we have done very little with the wheel.
We would love to have had FLIR in some of those tighter fishing boat situations but the Chinese government would not allow us to bring the one the owner has into the country.


July 28, 2013
Name: William Jordan
State: Louisiana
Zip: 71435
Country: USA
Subject: Route Change?

Question: Dear friends,
I have been watching your live tracking and saw at 8 PM, there was a very noticeable zag to your zig, umm.....what happened..... thanks curious that way... Oh and are you having fun yet!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi William,
I think what you saw was us doing an autotune on or A/P. The seas have built a bit from behind and we were experiencing a fault on the A/P occasionally. We spoke with our electronics supplier, James Turnbull, and he suggested running the autotune feature which solved the issue.
Yes we are having a lot of fun .


July 28, 2013
Name: Bob Danelz
City: Sacramento
State: CA
Country: USA
Subject: Who's boat is it?

Question: When do Bob & Dianne Conconi take possession of their boat. I assume PAE still has control until delivered to a home port. Just curious as to how this works with a "your own bottom" delivery. Any insight to the mechanics of this would be great. Costs, liabilities, stuff like that. Thank you. Bob

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Bob,
Great question.
We looked into the viability of putting the 120 on a ship and found that not only was the cost astronomical but the availability of ships calling on Xiamen was slim.
Running her on her own bottom pencils out economically and also gives us a great opportunity to experience the boat ourselves as the designers and builders. We will undoubtedly learn many valuable things during this voyage that would simply not be possible in any other situation. 4 weeks aboard will reveal things that we may miss doing simpler sea trials.
We will hand the boat over to Bob and Diane when we clear into Canada. Until then she is under our insurance and all liability is on us.


July 27, 2013
Name: Russ & Donna Sherwin
City: Prescott
State: Arizona
Country: USA
Subject: Congrats

Question: Jim and the gang:
As former owners of the N-46 Four Seasons, commissioned in 2000 and sold in 2008 after 28,000 nautical miles, we know and love Nordhavns. Congratulations on the new 120. She's certainly beautiful. I remember the around the world cruise of the N-40 was almost scuttled for lack of Wasabi. Hope you remembered it this time!

Russ and Donna Sherwin

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Russ and Donna,
How are you? Thanks for your email.
Just this morning we began dragging two feathers for the first time. We are about 130 miles south west of Okinawa in 85 degree water.
There are a lot of people fishing these waters and the challenge to nighttime navigation is a big one. We’ve woven our way through hundreds of barely lit fish boats that are very hard to see on the radar. With all this fishing pressure we are not anticipating much until we get deep into the Pacific but we have our fingers crossed just the same.
I asked Derek and Brett if we had Wasabi but they seem evasive on the subject. I think we may have a problem in this regard.
Thanks again for your interest and all the best….


July 27, 2013
Name: Patrick Bell, Sr.
City: Gibsonville
State: NC
Country: USA
Subject: Cold Weather Cruising

Question: First - fantastic blog! I appreciate the owners of Aurora and Nordhavn for allowing us along on this epic journey.
Now to the question: I'm quite interested in cold weather cruising for my family's next vessel, and as I see that Aurora will be cruising the Pacific Northwest, I was curious if there are any special challenges or considerations to the build if you plan on cold weather (and water conditions) operation? Is the insulation of the hull adequate, or do you need to add some for cold weather. etc? Engine cooling...advantages? Any HVAC differences? Maintenance concerns?
Thanks in advance!
The Bells

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

As you can imagine the condition outside are hot and muggy with temperatures in the 90s and humidity off the chart. The interior is air-conditioned with many zones and comfortable and dry. This is a chilled water system and is reverse cycle so as we progress north and the temperature drops, the system will transition from cooling to heating. For extreme cold conditions the system has electric heating elements so can continue to operate regardless of water temperature. Furthermore there is a diesel boiler that is interfaced with the system and can heat the circulating water to provide heat without excessive electric loads.
During late night watches Mr. Conconi has talked of his interest in transiting the Northwest Passage and he has a very capable vessel to do it in.


July 27, 2013
Name: Matt P
City: Phoenix
State: AZ
Country: USA
Subject: First Time at Sea

Question: Great to follow the journey, which began in construction in what feels like a lifetime ago!

My question: Have there been any serious issues (engine, systems) that have come as a result of being out to sea for the first time that have required immediate and/or ingenious methods for resolution? I always love to hear how the bugs get worked out!

Jim Leishman on board Aurora responds:

Hi Matt,
I’m happy to report that there have been virtually no mechanical glitches other the some very minor stuff. We’re getting a intermittent message on our engine displays that says Check Engine – diagnostic code unknown. It comes up on individually on both the port and starboard engine and then it disappears for hours. We’re not too concerned about this and will monitor it.
Our Auto Pilot occasionally shows a fault and disengages from the ships steering system. It’s a bit disconcerting but is easily reset without any loss of course. We’ll monitor it too and live with it without any deep trouble shooting unless the situation gets worse - at which time we would be forced to delve deeper into the settings to try to resolve things.
Other than the above mentioned items we’re 100%.


July 27, 2013
Name: Mike Deputy
City: Salt Lake City
State: UT
Country: USA
Subject: Electronics

Question: I'd enjoy seeing and hearing a bit about this vessel's electronics; fire safety, systems monitoring, AIS, Radar, communications, etc.

Thanks and safe travels.

Bob Conconi onboard N120 Aurora responds:

The question is best answered by photos and short descriptions. The basic summary is that there is no electronics that have been left out in the design of Aurora. In almost all cases there is duplicate or triplicate installs of various components.

We have not yet used or configured our SSB radio, I have the manuals onboard but believe this might best wait for our return to PNW, We have an Iridium phone port but did not purchase the actual phone as we are using VOIP on our internet connection to the vessel. We are achieving 1024 downloads easily and have a committed info rate for the VOIP so with a small lag, we have excellent telephone conversations with friends at home.

We installed a Dopler speed log, it actually measures our speed through water (as opposed to GPS over ground). With the two separate measurements, we are acturately able to calculate the effect of current. Even out here in the ocean, we have experienced currents of up to 4 knots.

The second interesting calculation is with the radars and our sat compass. Combined with our autopilot we can accurately demonstrate the effect of current on our steering. We are crabbing sometimes up to 9 degrees to maintain our desired heading. This is possible by two separate headings displays in the top right portion of the Furuno 2127 radars.

We are using Nobeltec Time Zero software combined with NavNer 3D BB, we have 2 software installs of Nobeltec Time Zero at each navigation station and then 4 separate installs of the NN3D, 2 BB installs on each of the pilot house and fly bridge and then 12" displays in the crew and kitchen quarters.

We rely heavily on the display of AIS information on our charting software and on our Furuno 2127 radars. We sometimes use the overlay that is possible within NN3D but often appreciate the simple display of targets ARPA and AIS on the radar screens.

We are using 19" Furuno monitors, almost all monitors have secondary sources that they can display other than our principal use.

We have FarSounder foreword looking sonar but are not using it in the middle of the ocean, that monitor is best used at this moment as the secondary radar display,

Our vessel monitoring system is Boening (from Germany), it is very good, was probably designed for major vessels which we believe Aurora is. Contained as part of the system is 16 CCTV cameras, 12 contain PTZ and 4 are fixed focal length. The PTZ offer 360 degree viewing on a continuous basis, they are colour and displayable on any of the 6 Boening displays on the vessel.

Boening also calculates our fuel consumption, electricity usage and almost any consumption of energy on the vessel.

I could go on forever but believe Doug will be posting a few pictures of the system screens as we progress.

Of note yesterday, we have a camera installed in the bulbous bow and yesterday we filmed using our camera in hand schools of dolphins going back and forth around our bulbous bow. Miles from anywhere and there is life out here.

Hope to share pictures in the near future.


July 27, 2013
Name: Marc Kovitz
City: Hoffman Estates
State: IL
Country: USA
Subject: Ocean junk...

Question: As a "dreamer" (I hope for just three more years), I get "conflicted" over fiberglass bottoms in an ocean environment especially when there's a chance of hitting something in the middle of nowhere. I see where some manufacturers use Kevlar to reinforce the bow and keel in the event of a collision or accidently grounding. The 120 is a big boy, but in the middle of ocean I doubt you want to run into a semi-submersed shipping container in the dark (or on a 47 for that matter). One the other hand, I have never read of a Nordhavn colliding with an object in the ocean and sinking. As a Lake Michigan boater I have to admit I never struck anything either that could sink our, "Playing Hooky". However, Lake Michigan U.S. Coast Guard assets (and other local government assets) are measured in "tens of miles away" (Lake Michigan is only 118 miles at its widest point). Where a Nordhavn can go it's a pretty big ocean out there and rescue assets can be days away (unless you use a Nordavn for strictly coastal cruising). Your comments (and have a safe and wonderful voyage).

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Marc,

Thank you for your question and I would be kidding if I suggested that we never worry about collisions with things floating in the ocean.

Our most immediate concern is the tiny fishing boats that are a constant nuisance during the night. The larger vessels are generally well lit and have AIS that clearly identifies them, their position and course and speed. AIS also warns us of their closest point of approach and it is easy to navigate clear of them. The tiny fishing boats on the other hand generally don't even show proper running lights and are often sitting tending lines or nets. I think that much of the time at night the fisherman are sleeping. Running along the coast of China the water is often less than 100 feet deep and many of these small boats are anchored and if the sea is running they can be totally invisible on radar.

The Nordhavn hull in the stem and bulbous bow area is in excess of eight inches thick and heavily reinforced with structure and has divided and water tight bulkheads. Hitting a 30 foot frp fishing boat would not likely cause structural damage to our 400 ton vessel but it would likely spell the end to a fisherman's career. As we have cleared the North end of Taiwan the fishing boats have all but vanished but we expect more along the Japanese Coast north of here.

Farther to the North East we do worry about debris in the water - some of which might be flotsam from the Japanese Tsunami. We worry most about floating lines and nets that could fowl our propellers. We do have diving gear, pull saws and have the ability to clear a fowl but hope our huge Spurs Line Cutters fitted to each shaft will prevent such fowls.


July 27, 2013
Name: Tony Locke, MM
City: Anacortes
State: Washington
Country: USA
Subject: Build Crew & Route

Question: Beautiful Ship! I hope the crew that built it were allowed at least a short ride in it during the initial trials, letting them see & feel what they've so finely built.
Second, do you know which route that you'll take through the Salish Sea yet? The Gulf Islands hugging Vancouver Island or a bit more direct route south along the San Juan Islands and up Rosario Strait... where I'll be able to see/photograph you from Fidalgo Island? I'm hoping you'll take the Rosario Strait route of course. I may have to see if I can coerce one of my boat owner friends for a ride that day.

Jeff Leishman onboard N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Tony,

Some of the shipyard personell were present during the ABS sea trials and were able to enjoy a few hours running. We had three other shipyard workers with us on the trip down to Hong Kong and now we have three of the engineers aboard for the trip to Vancouver.
Our intended clearance into Canada is Bedwell where the owner has a beautiful home. From there we will continue on up to Vancouver with some additional family members joining the crew. So unfortunately we will not be going your way.
Hope to see you out there.

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: Terri Walker
City: Phoenix
State: AZ
Country: USA
Subject: Thanks!

Question: I just want you to know how much I enjoy and look forward to your updates. Not only have I learned so much about this amazing yacht and voyage but I can see that my son, Derek (the chef), is in very good hands. Thank you and safe travels!
Terri Walker

Jeff Leishman onboard N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Terri,

I'm glad you are enjoying the coverage of our voyage. Derek is a fine chef and a great guy to have onboard. We were lucky to find him. He and Bret are having a blast!

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: John Merry
City: Durham
State: England
Country: GBR
Subject: Food

Question: Hello,
I hope you have a safe passage in all weather. I am keen to know what provisions were taken on board for such a long trip with so many mouths to feed?
Also, it would be good if the blog can be up dated with copy of charts etc.
Looking forward to reading more as you cross the seas.
John

Bret Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

John,

We have an amazing chef on board who can make almost anything out of nothing. We were able to get a lot of great proteins in China, which we had room to freeze. The proteins alone added up to about 350 pounds. Starting a couple of weeks before the trip Derek and I began making spreadsheets for the number of people, days, and type of food to get. So far we have been on a rotation schedule of various types of pork, beef, and seafood, accompanied by starches and fresh vegetables. We also got plenty of canned foods, dry goods, nuts, grains and just about anything we could find in the Chinese market that would suit our needs.

In China, they have a marketplace called the Metro, similar to a Costco (bulk shopping), which is what we have in the States. After getting information from locals on where to find the best food in large quantities, we found out the Metro was our best bet. Our translator contacted the manager of the Metro, and gave the manager our spread sheet with the amounts of foods needed. The Metro was able to order out food and deliver it to the boat for us. Although this took care of the proteins and some dairy, we still ended up making about seven Metro trips within two weeks. Very hard work for both Chef Derek and me, but we both gained a great amount of knowledge for out next provisioning mission.

Due to the typhoon and various other delays, we were stuck in China for a little over a week longer than we had planned. The only food that has been effected by that so far are the eggs. Other than that, we were able to get fresh milk the day before we left China. We have still been eating amazing food from Chef Derek everyday of the journey.

Thanks for the questions.

Bret Leishman


July 27, 2013
Name: Robert Deichler
City: Las Vegas
State: NV
Country: USA
Subject: Sea Trials


Question: Beautiful ship..thank you for sharing your voyage...was wondering now that sea trials are over is there any testing done in open seas that could not be done before...Thank You

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Robert,

I responded in an earlier post that we did do extensive sea trials in Xiamen and also during our first leg to Hong Kong. We were able to test all the systems during those trials. However problems can take time to discover and only hours on the boat can reveal what those may be. So far we have had no issues with the exception of some minor leaks in the water maker supply water plumbing which have be corrected already.

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: Marcia Low
City: Port St Joe
State: Florida
Country: USA
Subject: Menu


Question: From pictures of two meals eaten on board they look rather meager. Who cooks and is there a menu planned?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Marcia,

I can tell you there is no shortage of excellent food. Our chef has been preparing three great meals a day plus plenty of snacks in between. There is always a platter of cheese and cold cuts or fresh cookies and soup on the cook top for those on the late night watches. Dinners have been plated so it may look like slim pickings but there is always enough for seconds and thirds!

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: Matt P
City: Phoenix
State: AZ
Country: USA
Subject: First Time at Sea

Question: Great to follow the journey, which began in construction in what feels like a lifetime ago!

My question: Have there been any serious issues (engine, systems) that have come as a result of being out to sea for the first time that have required immediate and/or ingenious methods for resolution? I always love to hear how the bugs get worked out!

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Matt,

So far we have been blessed with no serious issues. Actually none at all, however I hate to throw a jinx on us by even saying or writing it! We have an impressive amount of talent on board to deal with situations though and I am confident that we will be able to overcome whatever we encounter. As you know we did do extensive sea trials prior to leaving the factory in Xiamen as well as our shake down to Hong Kong. There were very few issues during those as well.

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: Mark Wilson
City: Baton Rouge
State: LA
Country: USA
Subject: traveling characteristics

Question: On my list of "Before I Die....." not going to let myself die until I get to take a trip like this, thank you so much for sharing the minutia of details!
1. is the boat on autopilot basically 24 by 7? Is the route and are waypoints on the route all programmed?
2. how do you change the engine oil on a continuous trip like this?
3. are you going to put some lines out off the stern???

Thanks again for the generosity of sharing all this!
Mark Wilson

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Mark,

Yes we run 24/7 on autopilot. The boat has two A/P's on board as well as two separate steering power packs which run the hydraulics independently of the other hydraulic systems on board. Essentially they are AC pumps (Jastrum) which are powered by any one of the three Onan gen sets.
We do not plan on changing the oil in any of the engines, generator or main, during the passage. We did full oil changes on all while we were in Hong Kong just prior to departure. We did check with MTU to confirm that it would be no problem on a passage such as this to do the oil changes once we arrive. That said we do have plenty of new oil in our new oil tank to accomplish a change should we decide to do so.
We are currently dragging two feathers and as I was writing this we hooked up to a beautiful Dorado which Chef Derek has already cleaned and is preparing to cook!

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: David Francis
City: Tottenham
State: Ontario
Country: CAN
Subject: Rudders


Question: Are there one or two rudders? Have azipods been considered for this size of vessel to replace the rudders?
How responsive is the vessel to rudders only without engine power?

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Yes there are two large rudders attached with shoes so they are very strong and well protected.
We have not considered pod drives for this boat or any other Nordhavn. There are many good applications for pod drives however we feel that the type of use that Nordhavns are designed for, they would not be as suitable. They are not well protected from underwater debris or grounding since they are very exposed. Servicing in remote locations could also prove to be a challenge.
We have 60 inch diameter props with 5:1 reductions gears which gives us efficient drive trains that are smooth and quite running.
The rudders are quite large and steer the boat with very little effort.

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: tim triplett
City: peoria heights
State: IL
Country: USA
Subject: instrument mast

Question: is the instrument mast hinged so it can be lowered to clear bridges. if so is it hydraulic or geared.

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

The mast is hinged so the boat can be kept inside of a boat house. It is hydraulically operated and the winglets also rotate so that the domes remain in a horizontal position. It is an amazing bit of engineering and took many talented individuals to design and build it.
Having the ability to lower it also make cleaning and servicing much more convenient.

Jeff


July 27, 2013
Name: Leif Pettersson
City: Zürich
State: Zürich
Country: SWI
Subject: Stabilizers

Question: It's a great pleasure to be able to follow your delivery cruise of N120.

What type of stabilizer system are you using on the N120 and what are your experiences so far? Are your stabilizers always activated or are there conditions under which you don't need them?

Greetings from Switzerland and best wishes for the remainder of your voyage!
Leif

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Our stabilizer system is by ABT and we are using a four fin design. It became apparent early on that a two fin set up would result in the fins hanging down below the keel. By using the four fin configuration we are able to keep the fins inside the box so to speak so that they are less vulnerable to damage.
The system has worked perfectly so far and we have even experience the "at rest" system while we were anchored out in open road stead awaiting our final clearance from Xiamen.
Generally the fins are in active mode 24/7 there is no real benefit that results from turning them off and there is always some sort of sea running out here.


July 27, 2013
Name: Jerry
City: Albany
State: Oregon
Country: USA
Subject: Log

Question: Thank You for this Blog!! I have been a Nordhavn fan for many years. My Question is about the log? how often do you log on this trip and how much information do you enter each time? Thank you again for taking us along with you on this trip. Jerry Mitchell

Jeff Leishman onboard N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Jerry,

We keep and hourly log going. The information includes lat./ long., speed over ground, sea state, course, wind speed and direction, engine room check, and quantity remaining in our day tank. There is a column for any relevant comments.
The engine room checks consist of a general look around, smell and listen as well as the use of a heat gun to monitor various equipment such as the exhaust components. We also do a steering room check during this inspection.

Jeff


July 26, 2013
Name: Marilyn Mower
City: Fort Lauderdale
State: FL
Country: USA
Subject: Diane's POV

Question: We at ShowBoats magazine think it is so great that the owners are making this delivery trip and we have been sharing the news with our twitter followers. Personally, I think it is a shame that more women don't get involved in running their yachts and standing watches. I see that Diane is on the watch schedule. It would be great to get a post from her about what it's like to stand watch and why she (apparently) enjoys it.

Diane Conconi on board N120 Aurora responds:
I don't particularly enjoy the part where I have to get up at 4am or go to bed at midnight but I do like sitting watch. I find it is the best time to experience navigating when you can't see what is around you. At that point experience comes into effect. In the Taiwan Straits it was a challenge dodging the numerous freighters and fishing vessels. However if given the choice of cooking/ cleaning or standing watch the decision was easy.


July 25, 2013
Name: Jacques Vuye
Email: jvuye@aol.com
City: Tour de Faure
Country: FRA
Subject: N120 engine room

Question: As many others I've been following the "birth" of Aurora, sea trial and now maiden voyage.

And thank you for this blog which allows all of us to be CSAs on your passage (Cyber-Stow-Aways)

Is there a chance to get a few shots from the engine room?
I realize that being underway, this may not be the best/easiest time to do it...so no hurry!

Thanks

Doug Harlow on board N120 Aurora responds:

Thanks for the question Jacques.

We will begin shooting a full video of just the engineroom in the next few days. Shooting video and photos in the engineroom will be no problem, even while we are underway, since there is so much walk-around space.

We will have the video ready to go shortly.

Thank you,
Doug


July 25, 2013
Name: Buddy Bethea
City: Stuart
State: FL
Country: USA
Subject: Fuel quality

Question: Hello Jim !
Your blog makes me miss our NH 55-21 ALWAYS FRIDAY even more!
I was wondering about the quality of the fuel that you took on before leaving. Are you polishing the fuel before feeding the engines? If so, by what method?
We look forward to "riding home" with you!
Buddy & Kathy Bethea

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Buddy!

Glad you asked about our fuel as it's a neat system.

Aboard Aurora we have about a 600 gallon day tank from which our engines and generators draw and return their fuel. From the 17,000 gallons of fuel stored within multiple tanks we transfer fuel to the day tank using a high speed centrifuge pump manufactured by Alpha Laval which cleans the fuel of any water or debris.

Thanks for your interest,

Jim


July 25, 2013
Name: Leslie & David Nack
City: Oceanside
State: CA
Country: USA
Subject: Bon Voyage

Question: Bon Voyage! The Nack Family wishes you a safe journey across the Pacific. We look forward to all updates.

Jeff Leishman (and all the crew) onboard N120 Aurora responds:

Thanks David and Leslie! We're having a great time.

Jeff


July 25, 2013
Name: Jay Robertson
City: Morpeth
State: Northumberland
Country: GBR
Subject: Watch Times

Question: Hi,
Enjoying all the reports so far about this beautiful Nordhavn. Could you post how the watch times are planned and what crew will be doing what? Just curious how it is all organised on long passages.
Regards
Jay


Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Jay,

There are 14 people on board right now. (You can check out the crew page here.) We’re operating on two-hour shifts overnight and four-hour shifts during the day:

00:00 – 02:00 – Jeff, Doug, David, Densel, Bret
02:00 – 04:00 – Paul, Mike, Joe
04:00 – 06:00 – Jim, Bob, Johnny, Diane, Ron
06:00 – 10:00 – Jeff, Doug, David, Densel, Bret
10:00 – 14:00 – Paul, Mike, Joe
14:00 – 18:00 – Jim, Bob, Johnny, Diane, Ron
18:00 – 20:00 – Jeff, Doug, David, Densel, Bret
20:00 – 22:00 – Paul, Mike, Joe
22:00 – 24:00 – Jim, Bob, Johnny, Diane, Ron


July 25, 2013
Name: Todd Foht
City: Pulaski
State: Pa
Country: USA
Subject: 120

Question: How quiet does it run? Is engine noise and or vibrations noticeable? How much fuel does it hold and from statistics acquired are you able to figure fuel consumption at this point?
Thank you, Todd

Jim Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:
The 120 runs very quietly with the engines barely audible against the sounds of the air conditioning. It is very comfortable to watch tv or listen to music throughout the vessel.

I have reported on fuel consumption on a separate post but it is a function of the speed selected.

For example - to push the vessel at her maximum speed of about 13 to 14 knots consumes about 100 gallons per hour. To run at 7 knots can be done on about 8 gallons per hour. Our selected speed of about 8.5 knots will consume about 16 gallons per hour.

Hopes this helps answer your questions.

Jim


July 25, 2013
Name: Alex Powel
City: Steyning
State: West Sussex
Country: GBR
Subject: Pilot House

Question: Hello,
Firstly what a beautiful yacht. She looks sleek yet tough and luxurious and certainly put that 37m Sunseeker she was parked near to in Honk Kong to shame ... good job!!
My only query is that there appears to be two pilot houses on board the N120, one above the other. Is this right and if so what is the reason for this? Would it not make a more social area in the enclosed flybridge to have something else?
Bon voyage,
Alex

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Alex,

Yes, your observations are correct. She does indeed have essentially two pilot houses.
As you may know the owners are from British Columbia and spend mostly all their time cruising the Pacific Northwest. They asked us to enclose the fly bridge with a more robust method than the usual isinglass and it evolved into what is really a sky lounge pilot house combo.
It is my favorite place on the boat and with double sliding glass doors easily becomes a great indoor/outdoor entertainment area with almost a full galley.
We're having a great time and are making good progress with a favorable current.

Best regards,

Jeff


July 25, 2013
Name: Macolm Battock
City: Brisbane
State: Queensland
Country: AUS
Subject: Bon Voyage

Question: I have been following the 120 for so long now...It is such a thrill to see her on her way home...Beautiful boat...Have a safe trip and keep us informed pleased..

Jeff Leishman on board N120 Aurora responds:

Hi Malcolm,

Thanks for your interest in our voyage. We are well underway now and all of us are getting the feel of the ship and settling into a daily routine of watch standing, eating great meals prepared by Chef Derek and my son Sous-chef Bret, reading and sleeping.

Bob and Diane have a great collection of movies on board which they have been enjoying ( something like 3000 movies). We all can watch movies from our staterooms as well.

So for now life is good aboard and we will try to keep posting info as we go.

Best regards,

Jeff


July 24, 2013
Name: John Maurer
City: Port Huron
State: Michigan
Zip: 48060
Country: USA
Subject: Feel of the 120

Question: As your first yacht in the 100' range, how happy are you with the result? By the photos provided, the excellent quality is evident. What difficulties did the shipyard encounter with the first model? What number of crew would be required with this model? I know that most of your yachts are designed to be run by a husband and wife team, which would not be possible with this model. I commend both PAE and Ta Shing on building another great Nordhavn and hope to one day have my own Nordhavn built, although less than 120'!

Jeff Leishman responds:

Hi John,

As the chief designer of the 120 I can tell you am very pleased with the results. However this project included many very talented individuals that made it what it is. I have to acknowledge just some of the outstanding team members ;
Trever Smith, project manager
Phil Arnold, head engineer
David Jen, on site engineer and current crew
Andrew Mund, outside engineering
Destry Darr, interior design
Johnny Ku, factory project manager
Dan Streech and Jim Leishman,
And especially Bob and Diane, the best owners we could have hoped for

Obviously there are many who I have not mentioned and will likely hear from and to all of you, my apologies, your contributions are appreciated very much. Which brings me to the builder, Tsai Wan who is the founder and owner of South Coast Marine in China. Tsai is a great partner and long time friend and is to be commended for building this magnificent yacht.
As far as challenges and difficulties encountered during the build, we had our share but nothing that was too much to overcome with the talented team we had working for us.
This boat will require a minimum of 4 qualified operators for the basic functions, Captain, a good engineer, a mate and a deck hand. So a good husband and wife team are capable of running the bait with the addition of an engineer and a deck hand.
Standing by to build you your perfect Nordhavn, just let us know when you are read!!

Best regards,

Jeff


July 23, 2013
Name: AC
City: Denver
State: Colorado
Country: USA
Subject: Hull

Question: Gentlemen,What is the life expectancy on the frp hull on the 120? Can you build a similar size vessel with a steel hull and aluminum superstructure?
Thanks,
ac

Jeff Leishman responds:
Hi AC

The FRP hull of the 120 will outlast most of us. With simple maintenance it should not have any deterioration other that need of paint on a 5-7 year cycle. Longer if you have the ability to really keep up the wash and wax intervals. Aurora will be kept in an enclosed boat house in Vancouver which will extend the life of the Alexseal paint indefinitely.
We could have chosen steel with and aluminum superstructure as many of the high European yards are doing, nothing negative to say about the seaworthiness or quality aspects of these boats. However the maintenance required to keep them looking Bristol will likely be a bit more. Not only do the exterior surfaces require more, the interior structure and surfaces will also need more attention and in many case some areas will be impossible to access.
Nordhavn has always been very comfortable building in FRP so we tend to stick with what we know best.

Hope that answers your question

Best regards,

Jeff


July 23, 2013
Name: David
City: Vancouver
State: BC
Country: CAN
Subject: N120 voyage

Question: Can you share more blog entries. Those living vicariously as dreamers need more self-indulgence.

We'd love to know the thinking and reasoning behind N120's every move and heart beat. For the sake of participating with you and learning with you, please post more blogs.

Also, will Aurora be making landfall in Vancouver proper? That is my neck of the woods and I'd love to photograph your entrance home!

Jennifer Stern from P.A.E.'s office in Rhode Island responds:
Hi David,
Thank you so much for your inquiry. The guys are getting into their routine on board right now after their first full day at sea out of Hong Kong. You can count on more frequent and detailed blog reports very soon as well as some trip statistics. Stay tuned and thanks for joining us on this awesome journey!


   
 
   
 
 



Nordhavn Fleet

40

43

52

56MS

60

62

63

64

68

72

75EYF

76

78

86

120